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Thursday, September 23, 2021

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Psaki Won’t Say If President Biden Has Visited The Border In His Life

White House Press Secretary Jen Psaki deflected questions from Fox News’s Peter Doocy about whether President Joe Biden has “ever been to the southern...

Watch: FDA Official Advocates for Nazi-Style Registration and Blow Darting of Unvaccinated Black Americans

On Tuesday, Project Veritas dropped an undercover video featuring an HHS nurse recording her fellow staff expressing doubt about the COVID-19 vaccines and how...

South Carolina Supreme Court Unanimously Upholds Confederate Monument Protection Law

A Confederate flag flies at a confederate monument in front of the South Carolina State House in Columbia, S.C., July 4, 2015. (Tami Chappell/Reuters) The South Carolina Supreme Court on Wednesday upheld a state law prohibiting anyone from moving a Confederate monument or changing the historical name of a street or building without the Legislature’s approval. However, the unanimous decision also struck down a requirement within South Carolina’s Heritage Act that two-thirds of the General Assembly must approve a move or name change. Yet the justices upheld a clause in the law that said if any part of it was ruled unconstitutional, the rest would stand.  The justices also shot down an argument that the law broke “home rule” in South Carolina by illegally allowing the General Assembly to get involved in local affairs. “They contend local governments are in a better position to act with regard to this subject because ‘they can be more responsive’ to the thoughts of the community. This may be true, but Home Rule is not about who holds the better wisdom,” Associate Justice John Cannon Few wrote in the 22-page ruling. The law, which was passed in 2000 as a trade-off for moving the Confederate flag from atop the South Carolina Statehouse dome to the capitol lawn, kept colleges and local governments from tearing down statues honoring Civil War soldiers or segregationists amid the country’s racial reckoning of the past year. “As individual citizens — even Justices — we might look back on these events and wish the negotiations had been handled differently. The reality, however, is the Heritage Act brought the Confederate flag down from atop the seat of South Carolina sovereignty,” Few wrote. The law specifically protects monuments from ten wars, from the Revolutionary War to the Persian Gulf War, as well as monuments honoring African Americans and Native Americans and “any historic figure or historic event.”  Jennifer Pinckney was one of the people who sued lawmakers over the Heritage Act, arguing that it prevented her from making changes to a monument to her late husband, state Senator Clementa Pinckney, without lawmakers’ permission. Clementa Pinckney was a pastor at Emanuel AME church in Charleston, where he was one of nine black church members killed in a racially-motivated shooting rampage. #inline-newsletter-nloptin-614c7c52394c6 .inline-newsletter-subscribe__cta label { font-size: 1.2rem; line-height: 1.5rem; color: #000000; } #inline-newsletter-nloptin-614c7c52394c6 .inline-newsletter-subscribe__cta p { font-size: 1.05rem; line-height: 1.45rem; color: #000000; } #inline-newsletter-nloptin-614c7c52394c6 { background-color: #ffffff; border-width: 1px; border-color: #cccccc; } #inline-newsletter-nloptin-614c7c52394c6 .inline-newsletter-subscribe__email-submit { border-color: #e92131; background-color: #e92131; color: #ffffff; } #inline-newsletter-nloptin-614c7c52396bd .inline-newsletter-subscribe__cta label { font-size: 1.5rem; line-height: 1.7rem; color: #000000; } #inline-newsletter-nloptin-614c7c52396bd .inline-newsletter-subscribe__cta p { font-size: 1.05rem; line-height: 1.45rem; color: #000000; } #inline-newsletter-nloptin-614c7c52396bd { background-color: #ffffff; border-width: 1px; } #inline-newsletter-nloptin-614c7c52396bd .inline-newsletter-subscribe__email-submit { border-color: #eba605; background-color: #eba605; color: #ffffff; } #inline-newsletter-nloptin-614c7c52397c5 .inline-newsletter-subscribe__cta label { font-size: 1.3rem; line-height: 1.5rem; color: #dd9933; } #inline-newsletter-nloptin-614c7c52397c5 .inline-newsletter-subscribe__cta p { font-size: 1.05rem; line-height: 1.5rem; color: #2d2d2d; } #inline-newsletter-nloptin-614c7c52397c5 { background-color: #ffffff; border-width: 1px; border-color: #999999; } #inline-newsletter-nloptin-614c7c52397c5 .inline-newsletter-subscribe__email-submit { border-color: #dd9933; background-color: #dd9933; color: #ffffff; } #inline-newsletter-nloptin-614c7c52398c1 .inline-newsletter-subscribe__cta label { font-size: 1.5rem; line-height: 1.7rem; color: #0f733c; } #inline-newsletter-nloptin-614c7c52398c1 .inline-newsletter-subscribe__cta p { font-size: 1.05rem; line-height: 1.45rem; color: #2d2d2d; } #inline-newsletter-nloptin-614c7c52398c1 { background-color: #ffffff; border-width: 1px; border-color: #cccccc; } #inline-newsletter-nloptin-614c7c52398c1 .inline-newsletter-subscribe__email-submit { border-color: #0f733c; background-color: #0f733c; color: #ffffff; } Jennifer Pinckney’s lawyer, state Senator Gerald Malloy, celebrated the part of the ruling that struck down the provision requiring two-thirds of the General Assembly’s support to approve a move or name change. “The voice of the majority can now be heard about which statues and names best reflect our values and heritage. The road to justice is a long one that takes constant care. Today’s decision gets us further on our journey,” he said. South Carolina Senate President Harvey Peeler, who said last summer that “changing the name of a stack of bricks and mortar is at the bottom of my to-do list” issued a statement Wednesday noting that the protections over the state’s monuments and statues “were ruled constitutional and they will remain in place.”  Send a tip to the news team at NR.

Weekly Jobless Claims Jump to Highest Level in a Month, Far Exceeding Expectations

Residents of Meridian Heights apartments in Northwest Washington display a painted bedsheet protesting for the cancelation of rent due to the loss of jobs during the pandemic in Washington, D.C., August 20, 2020. (Sarah Silbiger/Reuters) First-time filings for unemployment benefits jumped to the highest level in a month last week, coming in well ahead of the 320,000 claims that Dow Jones predicted. With 351,000 jobless claims, the week ending September 18 saw the highest total claims since the week of August 21, the Labor Department reported Thursday. The figure marked a climb from the previous week’s upwardly revised 335,000 claims. In total, 2.8 million Americans were receiving unemployment benefits during the week of September 11, an increase of 131,000 from the week before. While the economy has recovered roughly 17 million jobs since pandemic shutdowns began in March 2020, jobless claims still remain elevated from what they were in pre-pandemic times, when they typically hovered around 220,000 a week. The latest report could be a sign that the delta variant of COVID-19 is slowing the job market’s recovery. Hiring, which has averaged more than 585,000 jobs a month this year, dropped to just 235,000 in August amid rising concern over the delta variant. Thursday’s report comes weeks after more than 8 million people lost their unemployment benefits after two pandemic-related federal unemployment measures that covered gig workers and people who had been jobless for more than six months expired. Send a tip to the news team at NR.

New Timeline of Mark Milley 'Treason' Invalidates His Defense

With all the news surrounding the border crisis, Biden’s crashing approval, and Hunter Biden’s corruption, another story flew under the radar over the last...

'Coupgate': Andrew Cuomo and Devoted Loyalists Decide to Go Down Swinging – and Missing

Being a disgraced former governor leaves one with a lot of time on their hands to sit and stew about what led to their...

Pennsylvania University Threatens to Punish Students for Misusing Classmates’ Pronouns

(Pixabay) Point Park University in Pennsylvania has placed students on warning, saying in an email that “action could be taken” if they do not respect their classmates’ preferred pronouns. An email from the university’s Office of Equity and Inclusion, first obtained by Campus Reform, informed students of its anti-discrimination policies, including its “Misgendering, Pronoun Misuse, and Deadnaming Policy.” “The Office of Equity and Inclusion would like to welcome in the 2021-2022 academic year with information on current policies that exist through our office and information regarding the Preferred Name Policy, instances of misgendering, pronoun misuse, and deadnaming (the use of a person’s legal ‘dead’ name instead of using the person’s chosen or preferred name), as well as resources on microaggressions and additional training,” the email reads.  The school’s “Preferred Name Policy” allows students and faculty to use their preferred name when a legal name is not required. The office told students that “any individual who has been informed of another person’s gender identity, pronouns, or chosen name is expected to respect that individual.”  #inline-newsletter-nloptin-614c6ebf86b70 .inline-newsletter-subscribe__cta label { font-size: 1.2rem; line-height: 1.5rem; color: #000000; } #inline-newsletter-nloptin-614c6ebf86b70 .inline-newsletter-subscribe__cta p { font-size: 1.05rem; line-height: 1.45rem; color: #000000; } #inline-newsletter-nloptin-614c6ebf86b70 { background-color: #ffffff; border-width: 1px; border-color: #cccccc; } #inline-newsletter-nloptin-614c6ebf86b70 .inline-newsletter-subscribe__email-submit { border-color: #e92131; background-color: #e92131; color: #ffffff; } #inline-newsletter-nloptin-614c6ebf86ce5 .inline-newsletter-subscribe__cta label { font-size: 1.5rem; line-height: 1.7rem; color: #000000; } #inline-newsletter-nloptin-614c6ebf86ce5 .inline-newsletter-subscribe__cta p { font-size: 1.05rem; line-height: 1.45rem; color: #000000; } #inline-newsletter-nloptin-614c6ebf86ce5 { background-color: #ffffff; border-width: 1px; } #inline-newsletter-nloptin-614c6ebf86ce5 .inline-newsletter-subscribe__email-submit { border-color: #eba605; background-color: #eba605; color: #ffffff; } #inline-newsletter-nloptin-614c6ebf86d79 .inline-newsletter-subscribe__cta label { font-size: 1.3rem; line-height: 1.5rem; color: #dd9933; } #inline-newsletter-nloptin-614c6ebf86d79 .inline-newsletter-subscribe__cta p { font-size: 1.05rem; line-height: 1.5rem; color: #2d2d2d; } #inline-newsletter-nloptin-614c6ebf86d79 { background-color: #ffffff; border-width: 1px; border-color: #999999; } #inline-newsletter-nloptin-614c6ebf86d79 .inline-newsletter-subscribe__email-submit { border-color: #dd9933; background-color: #dd9933; color: #ffffff; } #inline-newsletter-nloptin-614c6ebf86e07 .inline-newsletter-subscribe__cta label { font-size: 1.5rem; line-height: 1.7rem; color: #0f733c; } #inline-newsletter-nloptin-614c6ebf86e07 .inline-newsletter-subscribe__cta p { font-size: 1.05rem; line-height: 1.45rem; color: #2d2d2d; } #inline-newsletter-nloptin-614c6ebf86e07 { background-color: #ffffff; border-width: 1px; border-color: #cccccc; } #inline-newsletter-nloptin-614c6ebf86e07 .inline-newsletter-subscribe__email-submit { border-color: #0f733c; background-color: #0f733c; color: #ffffff; } “While the University recognizes the aspect of intent versus impact, we must recognize that regardless of the intent, if an individual is impacted in a harmful way, action could be taken if a complaint is filed,” the email reads. It is unclear what “action” the school intends to take against those who violate the policy.  The email also shared with students a Pronouns and Inclusive Language Guide that was created by a former student, according to the report. The guide recommends using “gender inclusive language” to avoid causing “trans and gender non-conforming folks to feel isolated.” It suggests swapping gendered terms like “boyfriend,” “girlfriend,” “ladies and gentleman” and “he or she” to gender-neutral versions, such as “partner,” “students and guests,” and “they,” respectively. Logan Dubil, who is a student at the university as well as a Campus Reform correspondent, told Fox News that the policy goes against many students’ beliefs, “especially conservative students.”  “Personally, I believe in the science. There are two sexes and two genders: male and female,” Dubil said. “The policies in question force me to go against my beliefs. The fact that I can be disciplined by failing to follow policies that violate my conscience is concerning.” Send a tip to the news team at NR.

The Labor Shortage Isn’t Just Closing Small Businesses, But Shattering Entire Retirement Plans

Gary and Judi Eubanks are one of a kind. Both in their 60s, Judi is a skilled pianist and Gary can often be found...

‘Our Kids Carpooled Together’: How Old Friends In High Places Assembled The Russia Collusion Hoax

The indictment of Washington attorney Michael Sussman — accused of lying to the FBI in order to smear Donald Trump during the 2016 campaign...

Interior Department Misses Promised Deadline To Deliver Federal Oil And Gas Report

Wednesday marked the first day of autumn. It also marked the Interior Department’s promised public deadline to release an interim report on the federal...

Latest news

The Question Biden Needs to Answer

President Joe Biden hosts a virtual summit as part of the United Nations General Assembly from the South Court Auditorium in the White House complex in Washington, D.C, September 22, 2021. (Evelyn Hockstein/Reuters) There are missing pieces in the narrative concerning the lead-up to the tragic drone strike in Kabul. NRPLUS MEMBER ARTICLE W henever something awful happens in our government, there is a kind of informal competition among columnists to be the first to write: “What did the president know, and when did he know it?” It is a tedious cliché. But the matter of the Kabul drone strike in which U.S. forces killed ten innocent civilians — including an aid worker and seven children — raises precisely that question. Joe Biden as commander in chief bears some general culpability for this slaughter — but if he was leaning on his underlings to put some bodies into body bags in order to grease the … To Read the Full Story
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